Milky Chance and Amy Shark play intimate show at Metro City

Photo: Liam Thomson

Photo: Liam Thomson

Words: Jasmine Uitermark-Thaung

Photos: Liam Thomson

Every time a festival leg hits Perth, the side shows are abundant and treasured, German wunderkind Milky Chance supported by the dulcet tones of Amy Shark at Metro City was no different.

Whilst considerably smaller than the Wombats show the next night, the cordoned off upstairs balconies - leaving the crowd to mull on the dancefloor - left for an appreciated intimate vibe.

Playing solo, Amy Shark showed punters why she came second in the nation’s Hottest 100 as she busted out notable favourite Weekends, if the person next to you wasn’t singing along they were certainly at least mouthing the lyrics. Emotions ran free amongst the soundwaves, spouting from speakers a little too crisp for such a cosy audience.

Photo: Liam Thomson

Photo: Liam Thomson

Including a cover of Eminem’s Superman in her repertoire, Shark’s initial melodic vocals took on a more expressive quality as they melded with the sharp guitar tones emanating emotions as the musician’s rendition of the tune wove its way into our hearts.

My favourite from Shark’s set (and coincidently also one of hers) for the night was You Think, I Think I Sound Like God. The singer said it was the first song she ever wrote but attempted to explain to the crowd not to follow along too closely to the lyrics as they were a tad nonsensical. The track has never been recorded and Shark at her last Perth set explained it would most likely never be recorded which I deem a tragedy. I’d listen to the rambling rhythmic lyrics on repeat if the track was out publicly.

Photo: Liam Thomson

Photo: Liam Thomson

The set break post Shark felt incredibly lengthy compared to the light but short chit-chat that usually envelopes the quiet before a headliner. Perhaps it was the anticipation we were feeling?

Appearing on-stage to cheers from an impatient crowd, Milky Chance played a balanced set, testing the mood with some mellow vibes before busting into Ego from their most recent release, Blossom. As the mood warmed up the crowd begun to groove to the band’s increasingly upbeat set-list but boy oh boy…the strobes timed to the double drums on stage were not punter’s friends, they were distracting, unnecessary and detracted away from Milky Chance’s stage presence and the music we were there to see.

Photo: Liam Thomson

Photo: Liam Thomson

Performing an array of tracks from their first album, Sadnecessary, the blend of genres from Philipp Dausch’s blues heavy harmonica solos intertwined with the melody of the folk guitar’s rustic resonance, a mixture of iconic Edward Sharp and the Magnetic Zero’s and Mumford and Sons.

Embracing a more polished production in their newer tracks the difference was palpable across the stage as each Milky Chance member demonstrated a confidence in instrument change-overs and on-stage implementation.  Milky Chance were clearly in their element as beats popped like candy and an ebb and flow of guitars drove forth the tunes.

Photo: Liam Thomson

Photo: Liam Thomson

Cold Blue Rain had me most in awe as the night came to an end and Dausch seized the moment to deliver a passionate croon for his harmonica solo. Before departing, the group gifted the crowd with an encore of some of their most popular songs, Sweet Sun and Stolen Dance that left each punter dancing in their own little bubbles as moves varied greatly few and far between beneath the technicolour lights.